Setting Expectations for Your Worship Team

We can’t expect anything from our worship team volunteers if we haven’t clearly communicated what we want from them! The job of a leader is to provide clarity. Clarity around what we want our volunteers to do, why it matters, and how to do it successfully. In this episode, Jason Squires and I talk all about setting volunteer expectations for worship team members. If you were helped by this content, forward it on to a friend. 

The Table Podcast

 
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Transcript

Alex |

Welcome to the Worship Ministry Training Podcast, a monthly podcast for worship leaders who are serious about growing in their craft and calling. My name is Alex, fellow worship leader. Super stoke you’re here. And if you’re a new listener, I’m going to encourage you to hit that subscribe button, because every single month I’m gonna give you helpful practical guidance that you can immediately implement into your ministry. Hit that subscribe button, and then go back through the past nine years of episodes and binge listen your way to a healthier ministry. If you’re someone who is really serious about growing as a worship leader, I want to point you to the Worship Ministry Training Academy. What is the Academy? It’s an online training platform that will give you everything you need to build a thriving worship ministry. You’ll get ten indepth courses on topics like set building, team building, musical excellence, vocal techniques, and more. You’ll get live monthly training workshops on topics that are relevant to you. You’ll get exclusive expert interviews with some of the best worship leaders in the world. You’ll get done for you ministry admin systems and audition process, onboarding documents, team training materials, and even team discipleship materials.

 

Alex |

We will take care of you so you can focus on leading your team. If that sounds like something that would be of help to you, you can try the Worship Ministry Training Academy for just $1 by going to Worship Ministrytraining.com. Sign up today drostanolone propionate for sale for your $1 trial, and I hope to see you inside of the academy. All right, let’s get into today’s episode. Hey, guys. This was a podcast episode I did with my friend Jason Squires for his podcast called The Table. If you’re looking for a new podcast, go check out Jason’s podcast. It’s great. He does it every week. It’s for worship leaders, so check out The Table. But this is a interview that he did with me on his podcast. I hope you enjoy.

 

Jason |

Hey, everybody. Welcome to the next episode of The Table. My name is Jason Squires, and I am joined by my friend Alex. I’m going to try it. Enfied. Is that right?

 

Alex |

You nailed it.

 

Jason |

Did I get it?

 

Alex |

You straight up nailed it.

 

Jason |

Nfiedgian I’ve been working on it. I was like, I’m going to get this for this introduction because it’s a good one. But I will tell you, every time I’ve had to write it, I’ve had to look at it to to see make sure that I got the I’s and the E’s and the D’s and the J. You have a lot of letters in your last name.

 

Alex |

Yeah, I was talking to Jenny McGrew on my podcast yesterday, and she was like, you should just go by Alex E. And I was like, I think I might. Yeah.

 

Jason |

You want to make people work for it, you got to make people work for it. It’s nice having a hard last name because you know, when telemarketers are calling. They clearly butcher the last. They get squires wrong all the time, which I’m like it’s phonetic.

 

Alex |

That’s hilarious.

 

Jason |

This should not be hard. Hey, tell us about you. Tell us about Alex and all things alex and Fijian. I’m going to work on them as many times as I can.

 

Alex |

Okay, you keep doing that. I am a Los Angeles native, been serving the Lord since I was 18 and been around the world, literally lived in Russia for two years as a missionary. Actually met and married my wife over there. She was in the ministry with me and was a youth pastor, worship leader, blah, blah, blah. My most recent role was worship pastor at a very large church here in Los Angeles. I’m still in that role, but it’s shifting slightly. And I also run worship ministry training, which is an online academy for worship leaders of courses and resources and live trainings and blah, blah, blah, zoom calls and all that. So that’s me. And I just love to encourage people and build people up. So I’m excited to hopefully do that today for the listeners who are on your podcast.

 

Jason |

Yes. You’re going to do it, I promise. I’m excited to hear what you have to say as we kind of jump into we’ve been talking about expectations this month and team time, what it means. And I think it’s one of the biggest things that can cause drama and problems on teams is if you’re not clearly communicating what you’re expecting from people. And so with that, let’s talk about it. In your opinion, why is clarity in communication important when leading a team?

 

Alex |

Yeah, well, I think and I stole this from someone smart. I don’t remember who, but I think that clarity and providing clarity is the leader’s primary job. The number one job of the leader is to provide clarity for the people who are trying to follow them, because if it’s unclear for the people, they won’t know which direction to go. And you and I kind of joked about it before we hit record, but you provided clarity to me for this podcast. You led me well. You’re like, here’s the questions, here’s the time. Click this link. See you there. You gave me you set me up for success. And you did that by providing clear direction. And I think it’s the number one thing that leaders are supposed to do is to say, this is what we’re doing, this is why we’re doing it, and this is how you can be successful. And if you can answer those three questions for each of your volunteers, then they can actually be successful. You don’t want to make it hard for them. You don’t want to make them guess, because then they’re going to be out of alignment and you’re not going to move anywhere.

 

Alex |

You can’t move a group of people anywhere if they’re out of alignment. Right? And for some reason, the Israelites wandering through the desert without the law. Kind of like came into my mind. If there was no clarity and direction from Moses or from the Lord, it’s like they’re going to go in 18 different directions than they did anyway. Even with clarity, right? Even with clarity, it’s like hurting cats. But yeah, providing that clarity is like the most important thing you can do for your ministry, for your team. And it goes to like, what are the vision and values, what are the expectations of a volunteer? Like everything like how do you get in there? What’s the code to get into the back room? Or whatever it is, you know what I mean? All of that stuff should be clearly defined for people so that they can actually enjoy showing up and just serving, right?

 

Jason |

And I think it’s important to remember that we’re dealing with creatives on a lot of levels and so we sometimes need more reminding expectations because of just the nature of who we are. You have the tech team, which is going to be not necessarily the creatives and then your creative team. There’s two different personalities that we’re dealing with and so laying those out, clearly I love bringing in the Israelites and that’s a great conversation there.

 

Alex |

Can I just add what you said is very important. It’s not just a one and done thing, it’s like, okay, I told them once or once a year. It’s literally like baking it into every single aspect of your communication. You’re like reminding them before you pray as a team. You’re reminding them one on one when somebody kind of goes astray, so to speak, right, or when somebody kind of stops doing what they’re supposed to do. You have those one on one conversations, you have the group conversations, you have the team meetings, you bake it into your emails. It’s repetition, repetition, repetition. Because culture leaks, vision leaks, values leak, and it’s like a leaky bucket. You have to keep filling the bucket and if you don’t, eventually the bucket will be dry and there will be no vision, no direction, no clarity. You have to say it all the time and you have a different team every week usually like, well, most churches have like a rotation of musicians, right? So like they’re only in that seat once a month or twice a month. It’s like you’re thinking about all the time, but they’re not. And so we need to repeat the expectations and the values and all that stuff constantly.

 

Alex |

So I would say to the listener, just ask yourself, are you repeating it enough? And I heard it said again by someone else smart. Like when you’re tired of saying it, they’re just hearing it.

 

Jason |

Oh, yup, yup, yup, yup, yup. So that’s the why, let’s talk about the how do you, how do you communicate, how do you communicate with your team? What is expected? Like you said, you mentioned not just doing, we talked about not just doing the one and done. But I mean, regularly having this conversation, but like, how would you say is a good way to go about making sure that we’re doing this on a regular basis?

 

Alex |

Yeah, well, the first thing is, like I said, bake it into everything you can, but when you’re bringing on a new team member, that is the best time to shape them into the type of team member you want them to be. I call the onboarding process. It’s like a pressing machine. It’s going to squish them this way and that way until they fit the mold, so to speak. I mean, obviously everyone’s an individual, but it’s like your onboarding process is that vital, pivotal time where somebody comes in as a completely blank slate. They have nothing stamped on them yet, and you get to say, this is what we do. You could literally tell them, I think I said this in one of my courses. You could literally tell them, bring every volunteer brings ice cream for the whole team every week. That’s just what we do. And they would believe you right. They don’t know what’s normal. They don’t know what is expected. And so if you tell them that, they’ll be like, oh, okay, that’s kind of weird, but all right, I’ll start bringing ice cream every week. You can tell them anything you want and they will say, okay.

 

Alex |

And so you want to use that time really well to squish them into the type of team member you want them to be in that onboarding process. And you do that through documents. You do that through one on one conversations. Like when they first audition, you just set that table, so to speak, constantly. But you also need to have that conversation once a year at the annual team meeting. So if you’re not doing an annual team meeting, definitely start to do one. And you do it like the monthly trainings or the quarterly trainings or whatever rhythms you have in your ministry, which is a whole other topic you should be talking about, like one aspect of those things all the time. Or even if you text your team after the service is over and you’re like, hey, here’s the Livestream link, check it out. Really great. And then just bake in something from your values. I love how passionately you guys worship today or your service to the Lord, blah, blah, blah, or whatever you’re trying to reiterate. You want to just pepper it into everything.

 

Jason |

What are some ideas of expectations that I should be communicating? I know this can be different for everybody, but when we talk about communicating our expectations, what are some things that because oftentimes there’s a term unspoken expectations, which is what tends to bring the drama. But like, what are some things that, like, in your opinion? Like, I should be communicating to everybody. Yeah, because you talk about documents and stuff. That’s what I was curious what your thoughts are on the what?

 

Alex |

Yeah, totally. I mean, there’s the moral expectations. Like, we are worshippers and so, like, we do not post naked pictures of ourselves on Instagram or you know what I mean, which obviously, probably some of us have dealt with that. Maybe not naked, but you know what I’m saying. I had a couple of young female team members over in the past ten years that it’s. Like, wait, what are you posting online? We got to talk about this. So moral expectations of like, we are worshippers and so we live trying to please the Lord. I always say we’re not looking for perfection, but we’re looking that you’re progressing and you’re progressing in your holiness. Right? Because nobody’s perfect. But we should see that you’re attending church when you’re not scheduled and you’re growing in your prayer life or you’re growing in your scripture reading or you’re daily in the Word or whatever the spiritual side should be. Iterated what you want from them. And also the negative side of that. We don’t drink on our team. Everybody has their own opinion about that. I’m just saying that’s an example. We don’t drink. If we see you out, like, partying on your social media, we’re going to have a conversation about that.

 

Alex |

So the moral side and then the practical side of like, we expect you to respond to planning center requests within 24 to 48 hours from when we send them. And if you’re going to cancel, here’s what you’re supposed to do. Either some teams, it’s like trying to replace yourself, or other teams, it’s like, let your team leader know and then stuff like, we expect you to be on time to rehearsal. And here’s dress code. Like literally having a document where you have examples of pictures of like, this is appropriate dress for Sunday, this is appropriate dress for our Thursday service. And then even stuff which is a huge one. Preparation. We expect you to prepare your parts at home. Rehearsal is when we put it together. Practice is what you do as an individual. So, yeah, all of those types of things need to be communicated because you can’t expect what you don’t request, you know what I mean? Like you have to request what you want for people to know what to give you. And so, yeah, you got to just paint the line in the sand and say, this is it. Let’s do it together.

 

Alex |

We’re all doing this together. And then making it like I said, it’s not like an abnormal thing. Like, this is a totally normal thing. I always tell our team members when they’re coming on and say, hey, feedback is a huge part of our culture. We all give each other feedback. Like, hey, you did great here. And we always try to be encouraging. And then it’s like if we see an area where we want you to grow, we’re going to tell you it’s totally normal. Don’t be freaked out, don’t be offended. We do it with everybody. People do it to me. As the leader, I’m open to feedback. If you see anything I can do better, please tell me. And you just like, make it normal. Whatever you make normal will be normal.

 

Jason |

I love it. You talked a little bit about bringing on a new volunteer, but if I’m bringing somebody new into the conversation, is it like, come on in and then wait till the next time we talk about expectations or you’re communicating the expectations as they on board and how are you doing that?

 

Alex |

Yeah, everybody’s going to have their own training process. For me, I think auditioning is more like interviewing. Like, I want to know who you are, I want to see, do you fit? So it’s basically like an introduction. You’re introducing yourself to them and you’re also introducing them to the team culture, the team dynamics. So even in that very first conversation, kind of painting a picture of, like, this is what it’s like to be part of our team, this is what our vision is, these are our values, like, this is who we are. You don’t have to go into super detail because you don’t even know if they’re going to come onto the team, right? But it’s just kind of an introduction and trying to figure out, should I even audition this person? Should we even do the musical assessment portion of the audition? Right? And I have a whole course on auditioning and everything, so I don’t call it audition, I call it like an interview. And then there’s a musical assessment. And I do that because it’s like you’re starting to see where they’re at so that you can give them feedback, so that you can coach them, because nobody’s perfect.

 

Alex |

So your job is to just help them grow anyway. So once you do that musical assessment, that’s when you lay it on them. If you see, OK, they’ve got the heart, they’ve got the cultural fit and they’ve got the musical fit. I’m going to lay on all the documents and lay it all out. You don’t do it right up front, and then after that, you schedule them for some training. And so they’re around the team, but they’re not playing it and they’re just around observing. They’re around getting a vibe. And the cool thing is, when you do this right and you form each team member into the kind of person that you want, and you’re constantly keeping the temperature of the team the way that you want it, then when new people are added to the team, they just, by osmosis, become part of that culture. And they start to act that way, too. Anyway, the trainings help because they’re just observing and they’re there around the team, listening to how the team talks, just getting a vibe and standing awkwardly in the corner as you try to like, hey, come on, come on, what do you think about this?

 

Alex |

You know what I mean? So anyway, those are some thoughts.

 

Jason |

No, totally. And I think a lot of it’s, like, people actually thrive with boundaries. They thrive when there’s something around them where they know how to respond and where to go. It’s not just this, like, open season, open, free space. It’s like, I know I need to know when I walk in what everybody wants to know, what’s expected of them when they walk in the room. And so I love that. What if someone is listening to realizing they’ve never specifically communicated what they expect from their team? What should they be thinking about having that conversation? What should they be thinking about taking a step forward? And I’ve never done it. And so do I just start doing it, or do I have a team night where we talk about everything? Or what would be a good place to start this conversation if I’ve never done it?

 

Alex |

Yeah, I love your question. You have really great questions.

 

Jason |

Oh, thank you.

 

Alex |

Because you’re thinking like the person listening, which is a good interviewer. Yes. And if you’re listening and you’re like, oh, my gosh, I’ve never done any of this, I just want to encourage you. Like, it’s okay. It’s better to start late than to never start. So, like, it’s okay. You are where you are. God has you. God has you where you are. You’re hearing this, you’re realizing you need to do better. Praise God for all of that and just say, all right, I’m going to do this, and it’s going to be bumpy, and I’m going to figure it out as I go. So give yourself a little bit of grace. I’ll say first. Secondly, you just have to start. And what I would say is, like, have a team meeting, first of all. Kind of get some of this stuff figured out in your head. And I don’t want to plug the Academy too much, but I actually have, like, a vision values on boarding doc template that you can get in the academy and you can work through it and create all of these materials. It will help you think through this process. So once you have it figured out, this is what I want to build with my team, and these are the expectations, then you have to call a meeting and say, hey, guys, I’m so sorry.

 

Alex |

I have really failed as a leader. And that is the first thing you say, because when you say that, all the walls come down and you’re like, you’re owning it. You’re owning that you messed up. You don’t want to completely beat yourself up, but just say that, hey, guys, I just want to apologize. I realize that I haven’t been doing a good job creating clarity around the expectations of our team. I totally own that. And I would just want to apologize, and I say, moving forward, I want to do better. And so this meeting is about starting that process, and I really need you guys to go on this journey with me and help me figure this out, because we want to be a healthy team. We want to be in this team. So you have that little speech. You kind of explain your vision, values, expectations, whatever, and then say, Guys, let’s do this together. Help me refine this. Any questions? And most people on the team aren’t going to give it much feedback at all. They’re just like, okay, cool. And then now comes the hard job of just repeating, having those hard conversations, just baking it into all of your communication, putting it on the walls in your, whatever, back room area.

 

Alex |

Just go for it, and you will see progress. But it’s not going to be overnight, and healthy cultures take time to build. And so those would be some thoughts. If you’re listening and realizing you need to start, just start now.

 

Jason |

I’m asking the hard question. What do I do if people aren’t meeting the expectations? All right, I’m going to ask you, and you get to answer it whenever you say here. But it’s not a fun question, but it’s something, as a leader, we have to deal with. And actually, it’s that time when you have to kind of reexplain the expectations. But if I’m dealing with somebody, I’m thinking right now, somebody is listening to the podcast going, I’ve explained it, and it’s not clicking, and there’s having problems on the team. But if I say something, I may not have a drummer, and that’s going to be a hard thing to not have a drummer do I deal with the problems so I can have a drummer? And these are the things we all deal with. But what are your thoughts on how to handle that?

 

Alex |

Yeah. Thank you. There’s two parts of that that I feel like I want to address. One is like, well, if I do say something and then I won’t have a drummer, that’s a big, real problem that I want to talk about. The other part of the question is just how do you have those conversations? So I want to deal with that drummer dilemma, and I know that’s just, like, it covers multiple instruments, obviously.

 

Jason |

Yeah. Everybody picks on the drummer.

 

Alex |

Yes, exactly. But here’s the truth, right, Jason? If we go back to what Jesus actually wants for our team, which is, like, spiritual growth, spiritual fruit, spiritual whatever, first of all, if that drummer is literally, like, a heathen, a pagan, and he’s, like, doing bad stuff that you know about, and you’re like, But I need a drummer. No, you don’t. Okay. Jesus will be more honored by you not having that drummer on stage than by having a drummer just so you sound like a band on the album. Right? It’s like Jesus does not care if it’s a spiritual issue, and it’s literally like, he’s in sin or she’s in sin or whatever you address that because you’re a pastor, you’re a shepherd, you’re the protector of God’s block. And do not let wolves been among the sheep. Right. And a bad apple will spoil the whole bunch, by the way. So you have to deal pretty swiftly with sin issues on your team. If it’s more of like, oh, he’s always late, or she’s always late, or this, you need to also deal pretty swiftly, not like, harshly lovingly. Jesus always spoke with grace and truth, right?

 

Alex |

So we have to have both. And he gives us a billion shots at things. Like, he doesn’t just, like, chop off our heads the minute we mess up, but he does lovingly to call us up to a higher standard. And we have the choice as believers whether or not to go with Him where he’s leading us. And the same thing is true with your team. So if you’ve got someone on your team who’s, like, they’re not hitting the standard, you have to talk to them about it. Not publicly, not in front of the whole team. I mean, if half of your team is late on Sunday or whatever, you can say to the whole team like, hey, guys, we need to remember that. We need to be on time. And here’s why. You always want to explain why you’re asking them to do what you’re asking them to do, because if they don’t get why, then it doesn’t connect in their brain. So anyway, privately pull that person aside and just have conversation with them. Put on your big boy, big girl pants and just say, hey, I noticed this, what’s going on? And I really need you to grow in this area because and then again, give the why in that private conversation.

 

Alex |

Okay? That’s a lot of different thoughts about totally. So what we’re going to say you’re good?

 

Jason |

No get. Boom.

 

Alex |

Okay. The other question that I was going to answer was regarding to how do you have that conversation? I guess I kind of answered it. Right. But I guess what I want to say is you must protect your team. And I said this at a conference that both Jason and I were at, the Worship Innovators Conference, which everybody listening should go to next year because it was so good.

 

Jason |

Absolutely.

 

Alex |

I said, culture is created by what you celebrate and what you tolerate. So if you celebrate the good things and you cut out the bad things, then you’re going to have a really healthy environment. But if you let the bad things fester and grow and you tolerate all sorts of behavior that you know you shouldn’t, you are ruining your team for everyone else. So you must protect the culture of your team, and you do that by calling people back to the expectations of standards that you set out for the good of everyone.

 

Jason |

I want to go back to something you said about your why. And I think that’s an important statement because if I come to somebody excuse me, if I come to somebody and say this is wrong or this is happening, their immediate response is going to be your picking on me. Like it’s you coming at me. But if you come and say why, especially if the Y is referring back to your values and back to your expectations, you’re not the one actually saying it. It’s coming from this is the team, this is who we are. And I’m a firm believer in all things of understanding your why and why you’re doing it, why it exists. Life is too short to just do things to do things. And it’s like if we don’t understand the why into why things are taking place, then we’re just kind of like existing on a planet as opposed to being intentional about who it is or what it is that we’re doing and why it is we’re doing. And so I love that. I love those thoughts. Do you have any more thoughts on expectations with teams? Do you have any more things you wanted to throw in there?

 

Alex |

I feel like we covered a lot of important topics that people will spend the next year working on. Yeah, I think there’s probably some more rattling around back there, but it’s not worth sharing at this point. It would be an overload.

 

Jason |

Yeah, I love it. I’m glad you said that, actually, because it’s important to realize that these kinds of things don’t just flip the switch on on Sunday and it’s not a go back and everything’s going to work. When you look at a team that is doing things well, they didn’t do things well on day one. And we’re all in process and we’re all understanding step into whatever it is that we’re looking at and so encouraging people just to take the moments to just take a little bit out of what Alex said today and just not try and go implement everything tomorrow. But like over the course of a season implementing these things, it’s a big scenario. So we call our podcast the Table and the Table. We eat good food at the table and I also believe that good conversation happens around good food. If you’re going to have a team night, it’s important to have food. It kind of breaks down that call. Everybody likes to have food in their hand when they’re talking. So if I’m coming over to the NFI edge in house, see what I did there? There’s so many syllables in there and the NFI edging house, what would you be putting on the table for dinner?

 

Alex |

I love that question. Jason am horrible at cooking. I burn everything I cook. I am a joke of a cook. It is not my skill set. That’s an excuse because of course you can learn how to cook. But if your wife is a good cook, then why. Do you need to learn how to cook anyway? So I would probably not cook anything for you, Jason, but my wife would, and she grew up in the Soviet Union, so she was born and raised in Uzbekistan. So we would probably have something from that region of the world. Probably like Porsche soup with some toast or Borshe is like a bright red beet soup and it’s actually really good. It looks like bloody, like, you know, really vividly bright red, but it’s delicious. Or like cabbage, steamed stuffed cabbage wrapped with like, meat and like rice and herbs and like ground beef or whatever. Ground something. And then in a cabbage wrap thing with some delicious red sauce on top, something like that.

 

Jason |

That sounds delicious.

 

Alex |

It is good. It’s very good. I’m very blessed, man.

 

Jason |

Yeah, I love that, you know, your space and you’re like, I’m not going to do that. I’m going to let her do it. I’m going to let her take care of it.

 

Alex |

I can do sandwiches and sometimes eggs.

 

Jason |

Sometimes not all the time. When I get lucky, they work.

 

Alex |

How about you? What do you get at?

 

Jason |

Dude, I’m a huge smoker fan. I throw meat on the smoker and COVID actually made me learn how to cook better because I’m like, you have to be home all the time, you might as well enjoy it. And so I bought a new barbecue and a new smoker, and they both they’re on all the time. And I’m looking forward to Thanksgiving and looking forward to throwing a turkey out there or like all the things, if it doesn’t get cooked outside, my wife’s doing it because I don’t cook inside. I cook outside, she cooks inside. And we always try and get as much as we can out there. It’s like, let’s cook it, let’s smoke it and then bring it in. That’s us.

 

Alex |

Sounds good.

 

Jason |

And I think one thing that we do also that’s different than maybe some people, we have a drink fridge in our garage that we literally just call it the drink fridge. And it’s always stocked full of anything you want. You go out there and our friends know when they come over, they just walk into the garage and there’s all different sorts of beverages in there for them to have. It’s something that we started doing a while back and I have one in my office. Everywhere I go, it’s like you walk in and there’s a lot of beverage choices to take. So how do we connect with you? Tell us about Worship Ministry training and all the things how can we connect with Alex and Fijiangian?

 

Alex |

Thank you. Yeah, I think we try to be wherever we’re starting to try to be wherever people are. But the number one place I would point people to is Worshipmentistrytraining.com. It’s long, just like my last name, worship Ministry Training.com. And on Instagram, it’s at Worship Ministry Training, I’m finally starting to post more there. And YouTube? Same thing. So anyway, yeah, I’d love to connect, love to encourage. We have a mailing list that gives kind of free summaries of what we’re teaching out every month or every couple of weeks. So wherever people are, we want to be encouraging them because ministry is hard and we’re there. So Wish Ministry training.com is the best spot to go.

 

Jason |

I love it. And you mentioned documents and stuff in the training process. Do you have examples that people can look at and things that they can see of ways to communicate some of these expectations?

 

Alex |

Yeah, so if they go to the website Wishmasterfree.com and click on the Free Resources tab, there are lots of free documents they can download and it also puts them in an email sequence where there’s like 15 different super practical training emails, even like downloadable documents that they can use. And then we have an academy, which is like way more indepth, which is like ten courses and a whole bunch of other documents and document templates and audition process team training videos for your worship team that you can send to your guitar players, your bass players, your drummers. So, I mean, basically my goal is to give a worship leader everything they need, everything they need, the training and the tools to build a thriving, healthy, vibrant worship ministry. That’s what we do in the academy.

 

Jason |

Awesome. And if you are listening to this while you’re driving and you missed that, I will include that link in the show notes so when you click on it, the link will be there for you to kind of get out to that resource page so that don’t be writing it down while you’re driving. Don’t do that anyway. Don’t do that anyway. Hey guys, I just appreciate you guys hanging out. Alex, I appreciate your time today, hanging out with us, as we just can continue these conversations on how to be better at what we do and how to be better in this process. So I appreciate it, man.

 

Alex |

Thanks for tuning in today. I hope this episode encouraged you, helped you and pushed you forward in your ministry. If it helped you, can you take a second and help us by sending it to just one person that you think needs to hear this? And if you’re feeling extra nice, leave us a nice shiny fivestar review on Apple podcasts or like, this video if you’re watching it on YouTube. If you want to discuss this episode or ask questions, we do have a free section in our academy where you can post comments and questions and chat with other worship leaders just like you and also sample some of our courses. And you can go to Worshipindustrytraining.com Free to join us inside the free portion of the academy. If you’re looking for more, check out the full access academy. You can get 15 days for just $1 to start and try things out again. You can try all of it for 15 days for just $1 by going to worshipmedistrytraining.com. Hope to see inside the academy or else I’ll see you next month for another helpful episode. You.